2018 Annual Conference – Concurrent Sessions

Exploring your Dimensions of Leadership

Wednesday Concurrent Sessions

1:00-2:00pm

Effective Leadership Communications

Leadership and Management

Kate Maine
Chief of Staff, University of North Georgia

Effective communication skills are one of the most important traits of successful leaders. Learn valuable strategies and tactics to enhance your communication with a variety of stakeholders – including students, employees, alumni, and community members.

Auditorium
1:00-2:00pm

Exploring Technology for Leadership: Mobile Apps for Collaboration, Mindfulness, & More

Technology

Sherry Clouser
Assistant Director of Learning Technologies, University of Georgia

We all have our favorite mobile apps that make our daily tasks easier, more organized, or maybe even more fun. Do you remember how you learned about yours? It was probably word of mouth! During this session, attendees will have the opportunity to share their favorite apps for organizing team tasks and communication, learning on the go, mindfulness, and more.

Room A
1:00-2:00pm

What’s NEXT: Simple Strategies to Prepare for Your Next Level and How to Walk in It Boldly

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

JaNee’ Mobley
Chairperson of Pharmacy Technology, Albany Technical College

The presentation is designed to help attendees identify if and when it is time to shift to their next level, identify their purpose, how to prepare for their next level and how to make their first move with confidence. This workshop will encompass interactive discussion and comprehensive worksheets all designed for attendees to leave with a plan so that they move to their next level upon returning home.

Room B
1:00-2:00pm

Re-Writing the Narrative: Creating Structures of Support with Underrepresented Students

Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Sheri C. Hardee
Associate Dean, College of Education, University of North Georgia
Anastasia Lin
Assistant Vice President of Research and Engagement, University of North Georgia
Lauren Johnson
Assistant Professor, University of North Georgia

In this panel on Diversity and Inclusive Excellence, each panelist will discuss ways in which her office at the University of North Georgia has implemented programming to create a more inclusive environment in a local climate of limited resources and a national climate of social unrest. The three panelists will explore successes and challenges to diversifying a mostly white institution and encouraging a supportive and understanding climate amongst stakeholders. Panelists one and two will discuss efforts to diversify the institution’s College of Education, including the creation of a new position for Diversity Initiatives; the development of three partnerships with local school systems, two to graduate bilingual educators of Latinx decent and the third with an alternative school to assist students in attaining supports necessary for college success; the creation of a series of diversity dialogues across campuses; and a brief analysis of interviews with faculty, staff, and students on campus diversity. The third panelist will discuss programs to expand scholarships for underrepresented students. While many scholarships desire a broadened applicant pool, students of color often refrain from applying or are not aware of opportunities that exist. This office has made a concerted effort to increase support and response to students of underrepresented groups. They have partnered with multicultural student affairs and other student affairs groups to ensure opportunities are advertised, they have also attended seminars on working with diverse groups, and they have crafted strategies to support students applying for national opportunities to ensure they produce competitive applications that do not tokenize while also encouraging students to complete the application process. This presentation is not meant to be a recipe for approaches to inclusion; rather, it is meant to incite conversation on how we can work across departments and institutions to support our minoritized and underrepresented students in Georgia.

Room C
2:30-3:30pm

Should I Go for the Doctoral Degree?

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

Veronica Gilliard
Academic Advisor II, University of Georgia
Danielle Bostick
Academic Advisor I, University of Georgia

Are you considering pursuing a doctoral degree, but unsure of where to start? Nervous about the prospect of working full time while pursuing a doctoral degree? Unsure of what type of doctoral program would be best for you? It is absolutely normal to grapple with these difficult questions. After all, pursuing a doctoral degree is a life-altering experience. If you’re on the fence about pursuing a doctoral degree, this session will provide you with tools to employ as you make this decision. Within this breakout session, attendees will: 1) explore topics, both personal and professional, to consider before committing to a doctoral program, 2) learn what to look for when selecting a doctoral program that fits your lifestyle and learning style, and 3) learn about resources available to foster and maintain community with other learners, if you decide to embark upon the doctoral journey. The session will also allow time for a question and answer portion with the presenters. Danielle Bostick is a doctoral student and full time employee at the University of Georgia. Danielle is pursuing a Ph.D. in College Student Affairs Administration. Veronica Gilliard is a doctoral candidate at Mercer University in Atlanta and a full time employee at the University of Georgia. Veronica is pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership with a concentration in Higher Education.

Auditorium
2:30-3:30pm

Diversified Search

Room A
2:30-3:30pm

The New Supervisor (or What to Know if You Want to Be a Supervisor)

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

DeeDee Doeckel
Executive Director for Marketing and Digital Media, Chattahoochee Technical College

This session will focus on the four primary areas of proficiency needed to be a successful supervisor. Learn how mastery of these four areas can strengthen an employee’s skill set and profile in any environment. Hear how you can navigate potentially dangerous subject matter in a fair and professional manner. Topics of discussion include: building trust and respect, how to be fair and consistent, being productive in the workplace, and how to build a team. This session is perfect for a new supervisor, someone who wants to be a supervisor, or someone who wants to move further up the leadership ladder.

Room B
2:30-3:30pm

Data & Marketing: A Match Made in Student Success Heaven

Student Outcomes

Monique Baucham
Executive Vice President for Academics and Institutional Effectiveness, Columbus Technical College
Cheryl Myers
Executive Director for Community and College Relations, Columbus Technical College

Monique Baucham with Institutional Effectiveness and Cheryl Myers with Community & College Relations offer a presentation that will (1) showcase the importance of effectively communicating research results and (2) provide plans of action.  So often, staff, faculty, or students (especially) get the ‘Why should I care?’ when it comes to data and surveys. Data affects everyone and virtually every decision made on the postsecondary education level. By having two representatives from departments that rarely understand each other’s messages, we can show how easy it can be to make information relatable for the masses. For example, turning data into visually-appealing charts versus a page full of numbers and opening the lines of communication through social media and other forms of interaction. Today’s student wants to be part of the discussion.  By answering the 5W’s and an H (Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How) from the outset, everyone is in a better position of understanding the numbers and what they really mean.

Room C

BACK TO TOP | BACK TO CONFERENCE SCHEDULEBACK TO CONFERENCE HOME

Thursday Concurrent Sessions

11:00am-12:00pm

Critical Research on Sexism and Racism in STEM Fields: A Book Talk and Dialogue

Publication, Research and Practice

Ursula Thomas
Associate Chair, Cultural and Behavioral Sciences Online, Assistant Professor of Education, Georgia State University-Perimeter College
Jill Drake
Professor and Department Chair, Department of Early Childhood Through Secondary Education, University of West Georgia

Critical Research on Sexism and Racism in STEM Fields investigates the bias, stereotyping, and repression experienced by women within STEM-based career fields. Emphasizing the struggle felt by women within politics, education systems, business environments, STEM careers, as well as issues with advocacy and leadership, this publication benefits professionals, social activists, researchers, academics, managers, and practitioners interested in the institutionalized discrimination and prejudice women encounter in various fields.

Auditorium
11:00am-12:00pm

Institutional Representatives Meeting

This meeting is for those who currently serve as Institutional Representatives (IRs) for the GAWHE ACE Women’s Network, and for those who are interested in serving in this leadership role. GAWHE is building a network of IRs across the state. The role of the IR is to support the work and mission of GAWHE in the following ways: 1) promote GAWHE ACE Women’s Network at the IR’s institution/campus, 2) encourage colleagues to join GAWHE ACE Women’s Network and attend the annual GAWHE conference, 3) hold at least one GAWHE ACE Women’s Network event (lunch and learn, coffee and conversation hour, etc.) on campus each academic year, and 4) collaborate with the IRs in the surrounding area to plan and hold at least one area-wide GAWHE ACE Women’s Network event at one of the institutions/campuses each academic year. The goal is to have an IR from each institution of higher education in Georgia. If an institution has multiple campuses, then there can be an IR at each campus. The addition of IRs provides a framework for growing and strengthening GAWHE so that it can reach more women in higher education to better serve and support them. If you are interested in developing or strengthening a women’s network at your institution or would like to learn how others are doing this, attend this meeting! There’s no better way to help support women advance in their higher education careers.

Room A
11:00am-12:00pm

The Art to Achieving a Well Balanced Life

Personal Health and Well Being

Tonya Moore
Career Services and Adult Learner Coordinator, Gordon State College

Work, Life Balance is essential for any successful leader. Most people would say it’s not possible to have your cake and eat it too, but what is the purpose of baking the cake if you can’t eat it. This session will provide participants with the opportunity to discover how to maximize career and personal goals that will assist leaders with maintaining a healthy lifestyle on a mental, spiritual, and physical level. Participants will learn how to manage stress through consistent practices that produce a well-balanced life. Participants will create a vision board that represents new practices that lead to a well-balanced life.

Room B
11:00am-12:00pm

Institutional Diversity in a Digital Transformation Era

Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Shonte Matthews
Coordinator of Faculty and Staff Development, University of Georgia

We live in an increasingly diverse and connected knowledge society. It is critical for higher education leaders to facilitate professional learning and development opportunities that model diversity and inclusion in the process and outcomes to create sustainable institutional capacity for diversity. We already have the tools to do this! As ubiquitous technologies and social media networks continue to transform our personal communication patterns, as well as how we seek and share knowledge, it can create space to nurture professional learning networks of diverse ideas and perspectives that can transcend the boundaries of time, physical location, and positionality that challenge progress in traditional professional learning and development models. The presenter will highlight theoretical foundations and practical implications of the transformative potential of social learning and development within a digital ecosystem as an approach to enhancing institutional diversity capacity. In this interactive session, participants will: (a) gain an understanding of the ways in which social media can be used as a professional learning and development tool; (b) learn and practice “just-in-time” strategies for engaging in and facilitating learning to enhance institutional diversity efforts with the help of digital and social technologies; and (c) develop strategies for creating a digital professional learning network that amplifies voices of those who have been historically marginalized in the academy. Participants are encouraged to bring their smartphones, tablets, or laptops to the session.

Room C
1:45-2:45pm

Session One of Leading Bravely: Using the Power of Empathy and Self-Compassion

Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Pearl Alexander
Executive Director, Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology
Cheryl Cofield
Director, Inclusion and Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology

We all are affected by the current climate of incivility and disengagement in our country. Empathy is a fundamental social skill that helps us to feel and understand the emotions, circumstances, intentions, thoughts, and needs of others. When exercising empathy, we offer sensitive, perceptive, and appropriate communication in return to others. Self-compassion allows us to practice being kind and understanding towards ourselves rather than “mercilessly judging and criticizing,” who we are in the face of perceived inadequacies, shortcomings, or personal failings. The greater our own self-compassion, the better our abilities for empathizing with others and creating environments of connection, mutuality and understanding among people. Join Certified Daring Way Facilitators™ Pearl Alexander and Cheryl Cofield for this interactive two-hour dialogue designed to support you in achieving greater self-compassion, learning discrete steps to exercise calm, skillful, empathetic responses to generate good will, and improve your interpersonal effectiveness. Concepts are based on the research of Brené Brown, Ph.D., research professor at the University of Houston, founder and CEO of Brave Leaders Inc, and author of four #1 New York Times best-sellers and Kristin Neff, Ph.D, who is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on self-compassion.

This session is continued at 3:15pm

Auditorium
1:45-2:45pm

Yammer your Office using Office 365 for Professional Development and Staff Engagement

Technology

Tyrese Hinkins-Jones
Educational Analyst, Emory University School of Medicine

This session will show how one can use Office 365 Yammer for staff engagement and professional development within your unit, department or organization. Participants will get a first hand look at how Yammer can boost morale, increase staff participation and create synergy between staff and administration. Yammer can be your replacement for the old and dated “intranet” system.

Room A
1:45-2:45pm

Elevating Student Outcomes: The Strength of Connection

Student Outcomes

Elnora D. Farmer
Lecturer, Clayton State University

Online and hybrid course delivery methods, as well as changing student populations encourage the review of strategies and tools that can be utilized to advance and monitor student outcomes.  Through research review, examples, and resources we will learn more about strategies that can be implemented to meet student outcomes, and also increase retention and graduation rates.

Room B
1:45-2:45pm

Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time

Personal Health and Well Being

Kizmet “Kiz” Adams
HR Professional in Human Relations and Well-being, University of Georgia
Allie Cox
Director, Training & Development, University of Georgia

How many times have you thought, “if only there were more hours in a day!”  As busy professional women, we all wear many hats and struggle with too much to do in too little time. What if the problem isn’t how much we have to do in a day, but the way we go about doing it? In this session, learn about the connection between managing time and managing physical, emotional, and mental energy. Participants will identify their own energy draining habits and discuss specific practices to replenish energy and increase productivity.

Room C
3:15-4:15pm

Session Two of Leading Bravely: Using the Power of Empathy and Self-Compassion

Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

Pearl Alexander
Executive Director, Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology
Cheryl Cofield
Director, Inclusion and Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology

We all are affected by the current climate of incivility and disengagement in our country. Empathy is a fundamental social skill that helps us to feel and understand the emotions, circumstances, intentions, thoughts, and needs of others. When exercising empathy, we offer sensitive, perceptive, and appropriate communication in return to others. Self-compassion allows us to practice being kind and understanding towards ourselves rather than “mercilessly judging and criticizing,” who we are in the face of perceived inadequacies, shortcomings, or personal failings. The greater our own self-compassion, the better our abilities for empathizing with others and creating environments of connection, mutuality and understanding among people. Join Certified Daring Way Facilitators™ Pearl Alexander and Cheryl Cofield for this interactive two-hour dialogue designed to support you in achieving greater self-compassion, learning discrete steps to exercise calm, skillful, empathetic responses to generate good will, and improve your interpersonal effectiveness. Concepts are based on the research of Brené Brown, Ph.D., research professor at the University of Houston, founder and CEO of Brave Leaders Inc, and author of four #1 New York Times best-sellers and Kristin Neff, Ph.D, who is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on self-compassion.

Auditorium
3:15-4:15pm

Fear, Risk, and Career Advancement – Strange Bedfellows

Leadership and Management

Jennifer H. Stephens
Deputy Chief of Staff, Georgia Gwinnett College

We do not always think about fear, risk, and career advancement as being connected – but they are. To progress in our careers, we must take calculated risks and that means that inevitably, we must face our fears. Leaders – men and women – don’t play it safe. They challenge themselves. Are women biologically more risk-averse than men? If so, in what ways and how can this be overcome? In this session, we will reframe risk and fear in the context of learning. To advance in our careers we must be lifelong learners which means that we must face our fears and take calculated risks. An interactive portion of the session will address a series of questions in a small group setting. The intent of the questions is to increase our personal self-awareness of how we frame fear and risk in our lives, especially as it relates to our career choices. The session is designed to increase our understanding of the importance of risk taking in leadership, and how we can improve our professional skills in this arena.

Room A
3:15-4:15pm

Weaving the Threads Together

Personal Health and Well Being

Chaudron Gille
Vice Provost, University of North Georgia

Self-care is an essential prerequisite to effective leadership. Often the airplane oxygen mask is used as an analogy for this concept, that in order to lead effectively, to sustain adaptive capacity and resiliency, one must first take care of oneself. The goal is a well-lived life balancing the professional and personal. This can be particularly challenging for women. Many of us grew up hearing that we are supposed to do and have it all. The Enjoli perfume commercial from the 1980s, an “8 hour perfume for the 24 hour woman”, told us we could be successful professionally, a good cook, attentive mother and a sexy woman who satisfies her man. Women who chose to focus on their careers have often been vilified. We have only to recall the controversy that resulted from Hillary Clinton’s comment in the 1992 presidential race when she said” I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas, but what I decided to do was fulfill my profession, which I entered before my husband was in public life.” Today there are Lego sets of the women of NASA, but these societal expectations persist. As women and higher education professionals, what does it mean to find “work-life balance” in this environment? How does that change over the course of one’s career? As a woman’s career advances, her personal life changes and evolves as well. “Balance” may not look the same over time. In this session, we examine the challenges women face in trying to weave the strands of work and life together over time, discuss a mindful approach to life and work, and offer strategies and tools that can be used for self-assessment and creating an action plan, so that we all may have a well-lived life.

Room C

BACK TO TOP | BACK TO CONFERENCE SCHEDULEBACK TO CONFERENCE HOME

Advertisements