2019 Annual Conference – Session Descriptions

Storytelling session

1:30pm Pearl Alexander, Executive Director, Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology

Cheryl D. Cofield, Director, Inclusion & Engagement, Georgia Institute of Technology

“Storytelling” takes center stage. Foster connection with other women in the higher education community. Storytellers courageously share experiences from their lives, pieces of their hearts, and testimonies that reveal their own complex self-discovery, transformations, and truth. Notice diversity through fresh lenses and relate through listening and engaging in meaningful dialogue. Leave with new levels of personal courage, different perspectives, and tools to be more wholehearted, inclusive, and better mentors for other women.

Theater Room, Level II

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Wednesday Concurrent Sessions

4:00pm

Culturally Responsive Teaching…It Applies to Higher Education Too!!!

Diversity and Inclusive Excellence

LaToya Stackhouse
Interim Director of Residential and Campus Life, Georgia Southwestern State University

In this workshop, we will examine the concept of ‘culturally responsive teaching,” a pedagogy defined by Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings and has been used by many educators in Pre-K through 12 throughout the nation.  Participants will have the opportunity to learn about this concept and how to apply it to higher education both in the classroom and in the office when working with students.  This session will cause participants to take a critical introspective analysis of self and how we respond to our students by looking six principles of culturally responsive pedagogy:

  1. Identity development
  2. Equity and Excellence
  3. Developmental Appropriateness
  4. Teaching the Whole Child
  5. Student-Teacher Relationships
  6. Manage Student Emotions

The aim is to ensure that the attendee takes a holistic view of current practices and find ways to incorporate the characteristics of culturally responsive teaching: Validating and Affirming, Comprehensive, Multidimensional, Liberating, Empowering and Transformative.  Through group discussions and intentional activities, attendees will walk away with practices that will help to foster a culturally responsive environment.

Theater Room, Level II
4:00pm

Transition:  Seven Lessons on Leadership

Leadership and Management

Margaret A. “Meg” Amstutz
Associate Provost for Academic Programs, University of Georgia

Transitions can be challenging, whether expected or unexpected.  Are you undertaking a substantial new leadership role? Have you been asked to serve in an interim capacity in a leadership role at your home institution or another institution? What can you expect—and what should you ask—when launching into something new? From 2017-2018, Dr. Meg Amstutz served as interim president at the College of Coastal Georgia after 20 years of service as an administrator at the University of Georgia. This presentation will focus on lessons learned through this interim appointment and will offer suggestions for administrators accepting new positions, interim assignments or short-term leadership roles. Attendees will receive concrete ideas to help prepare themselves for new leadership positions as well as general thoughts on how to be successful in transitional times.  Time will be reserved for Q&A.

Cottonwood Room, Level II
4:00pm

Building Resiliency

Personal Health and Well Being

Kizmet Adams
HR Specialist in Well-being and Work/Life Balance, the University of Georgia

How easily do you bounce back from difficulties, disappointments, or setbacks? Resiliency is your ability to adapt and overcome adversity. And while some people seem to naturally handle life’s up and downs, we can all increase and improve our resiliency. In this session you will assess your current level of resiliency and learn strategies for building your resiliency.

Library, Level II

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Thursday Table Topics

11:45am

Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Leadership Institute – An Introduction

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

Aileen C. Dowell
Director of Student Integrity, Georgia Gwinnett College

This discussion will focus on the Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Leadership Institute offered yearly for women in higher education to expand upon their leadership development skills. The presenter will briefly describe the leadership institute and all of the available locations from which interested women may choose. More importantly, the presenter will expand upon the importance of an institute of this capacity and the experiences gained both personally and professionally and encourage other women to consider applying for this phenomenal institute.

Crystal Dining Room, Level I
11:45am

A Seasoned Woman’s Guide to Mentoring Millennials in the Workplace

Leadership and Management

Marti Brick
Senior Director of Community Relations and Marketing, University of Georgia

Jana Wiggins
Executive Director of Marketing and Communications, Georgia Piedmont Technical College

Since the term “millennials” was coined in the late 1980s, there has been a notion of misery in mentoring those born between 1982 and 2004. Some say they are not team players, they are needy, they are lazy and they are job-hoppers. Could these be common misconceptions that fuel an unsatisfying work environment? This table topic will explore the mystical millennial and how two seasoned, professional women in higher education have developed successful strategies for bridging the generation gap through millennial mentorship in the workplace. We’ll explore real-life examples through interviews and anecdotes to shed light and dispel the myths of millennial misery and mystery. We’ll share our experiences on what millennials say they really want out of work and compare that to what supervisors think millennials want.  We’ll discuss how to create strategies to engage, empower and develop leaders for tomorrow, all through the unique lens of female leadership. The end goal of the session will be to help fellow professional women in higher education focus on the commonality, collaboration and communication between generations and to blend the two worlds to foster a more functional and satisfying work environment for both.

Crystal Dining Room, Level I
11:45am

You Got the Interview! Preparing for the Big Day

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

Sherry Clouser
Director of Instructional and Curricular Innovation, University of Georgia

Leslie Gordon
Associate Director, Executive Ed.D. Program in Higher Education Management, University of Georgia

The time and attention spent crafting your CV or résumé and cover letter have paid off. You got an interview! What should you do to prepare? Is there anything special you should do to get ready for a phone or web-based meeting versus an on-site interview? What should you expect? During this table topic discussion, participants will share ideas and strategies for before, during, and after the interview.

Crystal Dining Room, Level I

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Thursday Concurrent Sessions

1:00pm

Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace

Leadership and Management

Nikki Tobias
Speaker/Consultant/Coach, University of Georgia and Grounded Vision

I have done this presentation dozens of times and women always enjoy it and leave having learned about how to show their colleagues, students, bosses, clients/customers etc. their appreciation in effective ways.

The audience will learn their “language of appreciation,” the other languages, and how to begin to assess what others’ languages are. They will learn how to use/show each language of appreciation.

Theater Room, Level II
1:00pm

Ask For It: An Inquiry in Negotiation and Leadership

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

Emily Saunders
Senior Manager, Training & Development, University of Georgia

Jan Barham
Associate Dean of Students and Director of the Tate Student Center, University of Georgia

Carla Dennis
Director of Administrative Services and Communications, University Housing, University of Georgia

Melanie Ford
Director of Construction, Office of University Architects for Facilities Planning, University of Georgia

Cara Simmons
Director of the Student Success and Advising Center, College of Family & Consumer Sciences, University of Georgia

Women are less likely to negotiate than their male counterparts, and multiple studies have demonstrated the social and financial costs of negotiation for women. Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever, authors of “Ask For It,” assert that women can learn the skills and strategies needed to successfully advocate for what they want. Presenters will discuss why asking is necessary to achieve your personal and professional goals, and they will give personal accounts of their experiences learning and practicing negotiation as part of the inaugural class of the University of Georgia’s Women’s Staff Leadership Institute.

Cottonwood Room, Level II
1:00pm

The Intersection of Gender, Race, and Caregiving in Higher Education: Discovering Your Worth, Tapping Into Your Resources, and Seizing Your Opportunities

Professional Development/Preparing for your next step

Pamela M. Leggett-Robinson, Ph.D., CAPM
Executive Director, PLR Consulting and Brandi VIlla, Ph.D., Director, Belay Consulting

Institutions of higher education have made strides to address the practice of racism and gender bias with the last ten years by developing offices of diversity and inclusion. However, most continue to perpetuate white and/or male supremacy in hiring, promotion/tenure, and executive advancement practices. Gender inequities in higher education are evident in gender gaps in faculty salary, workload differences, promotion and tenure performance guideline adherence, and leadership opportunities and promotions.

Library, Level II
2:15pm

Better Living Through Compassion

Personal Health and Well Being

Rebecca Koch
Director of Service Initiatives, Life University

Jennifer Valtos
Director of Training, Life University

Cynthia Boyd
Vice President for Enrollment/Marketing, Life University

Have you ever seen someone so poised that they seem able to deal with almost every situation that comes their way calmly, with care and consideration?  Have you ever looked at them and wondered how they manage to do that so consistently?!  What about an individual who has a sense of gratitude for all things around them?  Compassionate Integrity Training is a set of evidence-based concrete skills that allow us to develop and/or enhance those abilities within ourselves. Using observations and applications from neuroscience, psychology, resiliency-informed care, peace and conflict studies, contemplative science, emotional intelligence and systems theory, science is discovering that humans can become more resilient and able to flourish using a strength-based approach that asks, “What’s right with me/you/us?” instead of the more conventional approach of asking, “What’s wrong with me/you/us?”

Compassionate Integrity Training (CIT) is a resiliency-informed program that cultivates human values as skills, so we can thrive as individuals, and a society, within a healthy environment. By learning skills to calm our bodies and minds, becoming more emotionally aware, learning to practice compassion for ourselves and others, as well as engaging with compassion in complex systems, we can build towards compassionate integrity: the ability to live one’s life in accordance with one’s values with a recognition of our individual ability to adapt and grow, our common humanity, as well as our basic orientation to kindness and reciprocity.

Theater Room, Level II
2:15pm

Status Quo No More

Student Outcomes

Debra Tavaras
Adult Education Instructor, Atlanta Public Schools

Bevin Carpenter
Founder/CEO, Building Bridges Consulting Company

If colleges and universities are to recruit and retain Generation Z, they must take into consideration the needs of this generation. Generation Z (born 1997-2012) are more independent, practical, and aware of money than the previous generations. Their expectations of how their time is spent, will redefine higher education.  For Generation Z, higher education is not just a four year experience, but opportunities to leverage resources to secure a career of choose. They look at higher education as a means to an end, meaning that it is a path to their future careers and a process they have to go through in order to meet their future goals. Their uniqueness and their search for knowledge will be a challenge, as well as provide new opportunities for creative engagement in higher education. Even though they do not have an idea of which school they will attend, they do have an idea of what they want to do after high school and what type of experience they expect.

The session will explore Gen Z’s attitudes, preferences, and expectations regarding their educational and learning experiences, and how colleges and universities can respond to their needs. Participants will collaborate with their peers on ways to ensure student’s success by looking through the lens of the next generation.

Learning how to connect and engage with Generation Z is just as important as learning what methods are most effective in recruiting and educating them.  Participants that attend the session will gain a better understanding of Generation Z and be provided with tools to guide them to getting the most out of their college experience.

Cottonwood Room, Level II
2:15pm

Cultivating your Circle: Learning to Lead Together

Leadership and Management

Maggie Denna
Training & Development Senior Manager, University of Georgia

Emily Saunders
Training & Development Senior Manager, University of Georgia

While more women are completing advanced degrees than ever before, the proportion of leadership roles in higher education and throughout corporate American does not reflect this shift. In a culture where getting ahead in one’s career is not solely determined by work ethic or ability, leveraging relationships with other strong leaders is essential. But how do we cultivate those circles? Learn about the importance of women’s leadership circles, structures currently used at the University of Georgia to address challenges unique to women’s leadership, and what you and your institution stand to gain by being a champion for the women around you.

Library, Level II
 4:00pm

The Great Debaters: Leadership vs. Management

Leadership and Management

Tonya Y. Moore
Director Career Services, Gordon State College

A key element of a strong leader is the ability to stay focused on the larger goals; even the larger purpose can be lost to those involved in the daily work.  This requires a level of determination and delayed gratification to put off what is the easier path in trade for the larger reward down the line.

Management requires an attention to detail, and the ability to plan and juggle multiple competing priorities with an apparent ease and calm. Successful managers are able to balance daily task while sorting out what choice to make when competing needs collide within the workplace.

Whether you have a stronger comfort level as a leader or manager, cultivating a balance of both the detailed and wider perspectives gives the supervisor the ability to address the daily needs of the department while keeping focused on the overall mission and strategic vision.  This skill is critical given that many higher education leaders often must act in both capacities.

During this interactive session participants will have an opportunity to discover strength and growth areas while serving in both the leader and or manager role.  Generational Leadership and managerial traits will be provided by the facilitator to allow participants an opportunity to explore traits as a group based on various scenarios to achieve desired results. Interactive assessments will allow participants to see themselves in various scenarios and identify professional development goals to put into practice while serving as a leader or manager.

Theater Room, Level II
4:00pm

Developing Student Learning Outcomes

Student Outcomes

Monique Baucham
Executive Vice President for Academics and Institutional Effectiveness, Columbus Technical College

This presentation will focus on identifying the core general education competencies for the institution and infusing these core competencies into the program learning outcomes. Relevant assessments are a critical component of this process. In this session participants will learn how to identify the core competencies relevant to their campus stakeholders. Participants will also learn the strategies for effective cross discipline faculty collaboration and how to truly assess whether or not the general education competencies have been achieved by each program graduate.

Cottonwood Room, Level II
4:00pm

Leading and Managing Change

Leadership and Management

Jennifer H. Stephens
Deputy Chief of Staff, Georgia Gwinnett College

A critical skill at which every leader needs to excel is managing change. We manage change for our organizations and our teams, but it starts with a personal ability to manage change for ourselves. What can we do to better manage change in our own lives that will ultimately increase our leadership skills in the workplace? What is the difference in leading change and managing change? This session will focus on some of the basics like increasing awareness of our situation, identifying all potential solutions, identifying the speed of change, managing expectations, planning, listening, inspiring others, trusting, and staying future-focused.

Library, Level II

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